Before Ayushmann Khurrana Comes Up With ‘Article 15’, Lets Know What The Article Is All About

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After the blockbuster movie, ‘Mulk’, director Anuvab Sinha is all set to come up with an attempt in exposing the unsettling reality of caste discrimination in his next, ‘Article 15′.

The film will see Ayushmann Khurrana in its lead role as a daring police officer digging the rape and murder of two young women in rural Uttar Pradesh, a state infamous for its caste violence and rigid hierarchy.

The film is inspired by the Badaun gang rape and murder case, in which two teenage girls from a backward caste were found hanging from a tree. Initial investigation suggested that the girls, who were cousins, were brutally gang raped and killed. However, the local police and CBI later concluded that there was no sexual assault and the girls committed suicide.

Many have rejected this theory and consider it a convenient cover-up. The girls’ families have alleged that the CBI gave a false report at the behest of the affluent upper-caste Yadavs.

But as the movie is titled ‘Article 15’, before it hits the theaters, we should know what the Article 15 is all about. Article 15 comes under Part III of the Constitution of India, that deals with the fundamental rights of each citizen.

Here is the full article:

(1) The State shall not discriminate against any citizen on grounds only of religion, race, caste, sex, place of birth or any of them.

(2) No citizen shall, on grounds only of religion, race, caste, sex, place of birth or any of them, be subject to any disability, liability, restriction or condition with regard to

(a) access to shops, public restaurants, hotels and places of public entertainment; or

(b) the use of wells, tanks, bathing ghats, roads and places of public resort maintained wholly or partly out of State funds or dedicated to the use of the general public.

(3) Nothing in this article shall prevent the State from making any special provision for women and children.

(4) Nothing in this article or in clause (2) of article 29 shall prevent the State from making any special provision for the advancement of any socially and educationally backward classes of citizens or for the Scheduled Castes and the Scheduled Tribes.

(5) Nothing in this article or in sub-clause (g) of clause (1) of article 19 shall prevent the State from making any special provision, by law, for the advancement of any socially and educationally backward classes of citizens or for the Scheduled Castes or the Scheduled Tribes in so far as such special provisions relate to their admission to educational institutions including private educational institutions, whether aided or unaided by the State, other than the minority educational institutions referred to in clause (1) of article 30.

Although many have been able to break the shackles of class discrimination but most of the country still marginalise the backward classes. We hope Anuvab Sinha’s ‘Article 15’ will throw some light on the class discrimination issue of the society if not abolish it totally at once.

 

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